Argentina unveils new secret weapon in fight to reclaim Falklands from UK – talks demanded

PMQs: Johnson slams opposition over Falklands reaction

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Mr Carmona, taking up the position of Secretary for the Malvinas, Antarctica and the South Atlantic, said to Argentine news agency Télam: “Argentina maintains diplomatic relations with the United Kingdom, but with the Malvinas question as a central and priority issue and, for that reason, its objective is the reopening of negotiations for its sovereignty. He continued: “The issue of sovereignty [must always be] on the table” for Argentina to be constantly “open to dialogue.”

This dialogue, he added, “has the support of the United Nations, both of the General Assembly and of the Decolonization Committee and the Fourth Committee,” with “different calls for the United Kingdom and the Argentine Republic to establish dialogue and to resume negotiations on the sovereignty issue,” suspended after the war in 1982.

The UK Government has long established that it does not consider the issue of the Falklands one which is up for negotiation.

Mr Carmona, conversely, stated that the “recovery of the exercise of sovereignty is a non-renounceable permanent objective.”

He said: “The repositioning of the Malvinas issue in all international forums, in all the countries where Argentina has diplomatic representation, is fundamental to achieve this objective.”

Taking to Twitter, Mr Carmona posted: “I thank the Association of Journalists of the Argentine Republic (APeRA) for the invitation to participate in a virtual press conference with journalists from different Argentine provinces.

“The contribution of @aperaok to the dissemination of the Malvinas issue is enormous.

“The role of the media and journalists in the dissemination and consolidation of the State policy on Malvinas and sovereignty issues is fundamental.”

This follows weeks of increased tensions over energy extraction off the coast of the Falklands.

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In 2013, a referendum was held in the Falkland Islands, asking residence whether or not they supported the continuation of the Islands as an Overseas Territory of the United Kingdom.

This followed renewed calls on the part of Argentina to advance negotiations on the islands’ sovereignty.

With a high voter turnout of 92 percent, 99.8 percent of Falkland Islanders voted to remain a British Overseas Territory.

Just three votes were cast in opposition to this status.

The Falklands War, which was fought in 1982, left 650 Argentines and 253 Britons dead.

On Tuesday, Richard Hyslop, Falkland Islands Representative, joined Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle in commemorating those who fought in the Falklands War during a week of events leading up to Remembrance Day.

Mr Hyslop planted a tree in the ‘Constituency Garden of Remembrance’ on behalf of the Falklands in London.

Sir Lindsay commented that the garden “would be a fitting reminder of the sacrifices made by constituents from all UK Constituencies, Commonwealth countries, and British Overseas Territories.”

Mr Hyslop stated: “This new initiative from the House of Commons Speaker is a welcome addition to the UK’s Remembrance period, and it is wholly appropriate that the contribution of the Overseas Territories is also recognised.

“The Falkland Islands made a significant contribution to both World Wars, with 22 Islanders giving their lives in the First World War and 24 in the Second World War.

“At this time of year, we also remember the 255 members of the UK Armed Forces who died liberating the Falkland Islands in 1982, and the three Islanders who were killed during the War; their families, the veterans, and all those who still bear the scars of that conflict to this day.’

Additional reporting by Maria Ortega

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